Chopstick Dexterity Mega Challenge 3000

Filed Under (Dexterity) by Will Bain on May 20, 2015

MDG-4314

It’s the future and a mysterious plague has eliminated all cutlery, except for the humble chopstick. Only those who are one with the chopstick will survive.

In a world where the fork is king, one hero dares to rise against the tyranny of the tines. That hero may be you…
After the machines took over, humans were gathered to entertain the mechanical overlords in a series of increasingly bizarre gladiatorial spectacles. On this, the final day of games, the weapon of choice is the chopstick.

Whatever story you choose to believe, Mayday’s Chopstick Dexterity Mega Challenge 3000 (to be referred to hereafter as CDMC 3000) is a fast, noisy, sloppy game in which opponents try to be the first to gather colored wood shapes from a central wok using (wait for it) only (wait for it) chopsticks (gasp!!).

IMG_5136There are 25 wooden pieces: five shapes (shrimp, tentacle, nigiri, onigiri, sushi roll) in five colors (purple, red, yellow, blue, and green). These are placed in a large central wok. Each competitor gets a set of chopsticks and a smaller dish. The game also comes with 40 tokens that tell contestants the target shapes. When a token is revealed the opponents race to see who can collect the most wooden pieces that match the revealed token. There are 25 standard tokens. These match the shapes and colors of the wooden pieces. In addition there are 15 wild or special tokens that force competitors to fight over different numbers or combinations of pieces.

There are many competitions included with CDMC 3000, but the most basic involves using the 25 standard tokens. When one is revealed, the opponents race to gather pieces that match either the color or the shape of the revealed token. It’s good to start simple because once two or three sets of chopsticks are clattering about the central wok, things get messy.

Familiarity with chopstick use is a definite plus but some of the pieces are very tricky even without someone else stabbing at the bowl like a ravenous seagull. Moving the bowl is legal. Hitting someone else’s chopsticks is legal until that person has lifted a piece from the bowl.

Time-outs are frequent because the central wok capsizes or pieces get scattered in the melee. Once the table has been reset, the match resumes.

Oh the humanity!

Never have so many been reduced to tears by so few!

dexterity-party

We hold these truths to be self-evident that all are equal before the great wok of CDMC 3000 and that they shall be thus endowed with Major Fun.

Although the game pronounces that it is designed for 1 – 3 players (solo play is accomplished with a timer) it can easily be adapted to larger numbers. Players can form teams and compete in rounds or (and this is only for those who have a pathological desire to be the object of blame and humiliation) they can compete with a partner—each holding ONE chopstick. I’m not saying you should play this way. I’m just saying.

CDMC 3000 is slappy, stabby, table-smashy Major Fun.

1 – 3 players. Ages 8+

Chopstick Dexterity Mega Challenge 3000 was designed by Greg Lam and is © 2014 by Mayday Games.

Sock Puppet Charades is a KEEPER

Filed Under (Keeper) by Bernie DeKoven on May 19, 2015

After much enthusiastic deliberation, and deep delving by the chosen few, it became clear that Major Fun Award-winning Sock Puppet Charades was just too much fun for its award.

It’s the kind of game that you want to have around whenever you find yourself in a room full of playful people. It’s so easily adaptable to almost any setting with almost any mix of playful players. You can play in teams. You can play without teams. You can make up your own charades cards. You can write your own charades cards.

Here’s a little video, in case you need reminding:

YouTube Preview Image

And here, yes, is the Sock Puppet Charades Major Fun Keeper Award.

Major Fun Keeper Award

Richly deserved, you cute little charading sock puppets. And you, too, brilliant designer Jack Degnan, and astute game company Marbles the Brain Store.

Aztack

Filed Under (Family Games, Kids Games, Thinking Games) by Bernie DeKoven on May 17, 2015

aztack

It’ll take you maybe five minutes to learn how to play Aztack, and the average game lasts around fifteen minutes. It’s highly likely you’ll play several rounds of this not at all average strategy game.
There are 60 tiles – like dominoes – the kind of dominoes that slide sweetly when smushed around on the table, and clack comfortingly when stacked. The back of the tiles have two parallel ridges which play no small part in the clack comfort.

They’re not called tiles, though. They’re stones. Ah, yes, stones. The kind you use to build something like pyramids.

The first thing you do is take out all the stones, place them face dow on the table, and smush. We suggest collaborative smushing. Share the pleasure, don’t you know.

AztackThen you take 12 tiles, turn them over, and arrange them, face-up, in a rectangle of two rows of six tiles each. This forms the base of the pyramid. Now each player (2-4) selects 12 tiles, and puts them, face-up (that is, the tiles are face-up, not necessarily the player).

From then on, players take turns adding tiles to the stack. A tile has to: 1) lay across two tiles in the pyramid, and 2) match either the color or the design of the tiles upon which it has been laid. The game continues until neither player can make a legal move – the player with the fewest remaining tiles being the winner.

Easy to understand, yet challenging enough to make you look and think hard.

When the game is over, the thing you build together doesn’t look like your classic Egyptian pyramid, but it does look like something the Aztacks might have called a pyramid, if there were such people as Aztacks.

Here, courtesy of the BlueOrange ones, a brief, illustrative video:

Surprisingly engaging for such an easily-learned game. And it feels good, too. Well made. Carefully thought out. Kids enjoy it. Not kids enjoy playing it with the kids. The designs (“glyphs”) look like something an Aztack would make. And, o, the clacking and smushing.

Major Fun Award
Aztec is a strategy game for two to four players, ages 7 up. It is designed by Brad Ross and Jim Winslow, and comes to us from the oft-awarded Blue Orange Games.

Urban Fold

Filed Under (Creative, Family Games, Kids Games) by Bernie DeKoven on May 10, 2015

Tagged Under :

urban fold

Until now, we haven’t even considered giving a Major Fun award to a crafts kit. A product called Urban Fold made us reconsider our policy.

It is one of a series of products that come to us from a company called Paper Punk. Go to their site. It is well-worth the visit. For on it, you will see what amounts to a new, and very welcome approach to children’s craft kits.

Urban Fold comes in a reusable storage box that contains 48 punch-and-fold shapes (punch-and-fold, as you probably already surmised, refers to thin, cardboard shapes that you fold along scored lines, and then attempt to put many little tabs into their appropriate little slots – this is not necessarily without its challenges, and hence, though it is recommended for children 6 and up, we would add that children of that age who can actually get all those tabs with out bending the tabs or themselves out of shape are exceptional and should be treated with great respect and much hugging), 697 stickers (of the peel-off persuasion, easily peeled, I might add, and of sizes varying from large to meticulous), and 1 poster and planning mat (a large, two-sided sheet of paper – one side serving as a planning grid, the other as a guide to different kinds of buildings that can be created from the shapes and stickers).

The poster/planning mat shows you how seriously you can take the whole thing – which is always good to know. We, in our frivolously fun way, decided to ignore that side of things pretty much altogether – though, I’m sure, at one time or another, we’ll appreciate the depth of detail and probably regret our devil-may-care enthusiasm. On the other hand, we won’t regret the fun we had, not at all at all.

The die-cutting is sufficiently deep so that even the youngest and most whimsy-driven member of our family test-group (nine-years-old) could tear out any of the shapes without tearing the shapes themselves – which is no small feat. The peel-off stickers also peel off without undue damage to their integrity.

We all sat around the table, folding and slotting. It took the six of us about an hour to complete that part of the kit – a surprisingly pleasant, relaxed, and thoroughly constructive family-togetherness hour (which is in itself remarkable – we’re talking an entire hour here, together!). We had little time left, and spent that investigating stickers. The oldest amongst us was able, with great care and precision of stickage, to create something quite in keeping with the craft-aspect of it all. Doors, windows, all aligned with care and propriety. The youngest didn’t care about any of that. He just stuck things here and there, exercising his art in the fullest, making something closely approximating a graffiti wall, which turned out to be clearly the most fun for him and us.

And then, because we had to eat, we had the opportunity to be feel quite sanguine about how everything fit so neatly in the box, all the shapes maintaining themselves quite enduringly.

It’s this flexibility, this range of potential engagement that made it so clear that we had something unique here – a craft kit for all moods and purposes, something that could respond to the moment, could absorb a wide range of interests, skills, approaches, and constraints. The geometric shapes lend themselves to play – they can be assembled into almost anything we could imagine. The stickers, though detailed enough to be taken literally, could just as easily be collaged and montaged into multi-hued memorials to mayhem. All in all, Urban Fold turned out to be Major Fun.

family-kids-creative

MOX

Filed Under (Toys) by Bernie DeKoven on May 10, 2015

MOX

MOX is an elegant invitation to play, and whimsy, and laughter, and exploration, and shared silliness.

This is what MOX looks like when you make it laugh:

This is what it looks like when you turn it inside out:

And this, when it or you are feeling grumpy:

It’s such a simple toy, and it does so much. And anyone who is old enough to laugh can play with it, safely, alone, with other people who like to play.

It comes to us from one of my favorite toy designers, Alex Hochstrasser, whose company is called MOLUK.

I’ll let Alex explain:

Driven by a passion for great design, MOLUK strives to create innovative, sustainable products that don’t just entertain kids on a superficial level, but invite real interaction.

In a time where everything is getting more virtual, MOLUK offers toys that are totally manual, toys that get children to move and explore, toys that stimulate their senses and minds.

There are no ON and OFF switches, batteries or complicated instructions – MOLUK toys are powered simply by a child’s imagination.

MOLUK only collaborates with trusted manufacturing partners who share our values and deliver excellent, safe and long lasting products which are sold through a growing network of reliable and dedicated distribution partners around the world.

Major Fun Award

Wink

Filed Under (Party Games) by Will Bain on May 4, 2015

wink

Vigilance. Paranoia. Furtive glances.

Now that’s a party game.

Wink, by Blue Orange Games, is a cousin of the Assassination and Werewolf games that I played growing up. In these games there is someone who is “it” but is trying to keep the fact a secret. Someone else, the “inspector” or “detective,” is trying to find out who is it before it is too late. In Assassination, the “it” player tries to kill all the other players by winking at them before being identified by the “Inspector.” Wink takes this mechanic and makes everyone it.

It’s a brilliant move. One of the problems with Assassination-style games is that there are few Assassins, and that’s arguably the best role. Being a victim is only fun when you have a particularly dramatic death, but otherwise once you are eliminated, you might as well go out for coffee. Elimination games do not lend themselves as well to repeat play.

Using some cards and a pawn, Wink gives everyone a chance to be the Assassin AND the Inspector.

There are 2 decks of 36 cards called Face Cards. The cards are numbered 1-36. One deck is placed face-up on the table in a 6×6 grid. The other deck (identical to the first but with a different colored back) is dealt out to the players so that everyone has an equal number of Face Cards. Each person also has a colored pawn and 4 ACCUSE cards.

On your turn you take your pawn and place it on one of the face-up cards in the grid. You may not place your pawn on a number that matches one in your hand. You announce the number and then it is the next player’s turn.

But wait there’s more! The number you chose on the grid belongs to someone else at the table. That person wants to secretly indicate this to you with a wink. While everyone is taking turns placing their pawns on the grid, you are looking around the table for someone to wink at you. Chances are, you will also have to find the right moment to wink at someone who placed their pawn on one of your numbers.

But wait there’s more! If you observe someone winking at someone else, you may ACCUSE that person by playing one of your ACCUSE cards and shouting “J’Accuse!” in your best French accent (or worst as was often the case).

Points are awarded by collecting the Face Cards. After you first placed your pawn, when your turn comes around again, you must guess who has the card matching your number. If you are lucky then you saw that person wink at you. If you are correct, you keep the card under your pawn and the other person keeps the card in their hand. That’s one point for each of you. If your guess is wrong, the card under your pawn is turned face-down and you move your pawn to another card in the grid. You may also earn points by successfully ACCUSING someone. If you shout J’ACCUSE and are successful you get both cards (the one from the grid and the one from the player’s hand). You only have 4 ACCUSE cards so you have to use them wisely. Unused ACCUSE cards are worth 1 point at the end but a successful ACCUSE is worth 2 points (plus you rob your opponents).

We played with 8 people and although I was good at winking at my partners without being seen, I was TERRIBLE at witnessing winks. On the other hand, my neighbor (the guy who won) was terrifying in his ability to successfully ACCUSE. I thought with 8 people I would catch at least one furtive wink but it was very difficult.

Major Fun awardVery nerve wracking.

And Major Fun.

Everyone is always engaged. Right up to the end of the game. There is no elimination and no down time. ACCUSING is incredibly entertaining and is definitely the best part of the game (especially when you are successful). I’ve mentioned it before in reviews that many of the best Major Fun games have a little meanness embedded in them and Wink accomplishes this perfectly with the ACCUSE mechanic.

4 – 8 players. Ages 8+

Wink was designed by Fred Krahwinkel and is © 2015 by Blue Orange Games.

Patchwork

Filed Under (Thinking Games) by Marc Gilutin on Apr 27, 2015

Agricola, Ora et Labora, Le Havre, Glass Road……..Whew!

Uwe Rosenberg has become one of the best designers of the ‘heavier’ games of the current generation. Four games in the top forty, as rated by us (you, if you’re registered on Board Game Geek) is downright Beatlesque, as far as world domination goes.

But as good as these games are, none of them will be getting a Major Fun Award any time soon.

Not because they’re not terrific. Herr Rosenberg does great work.
But they are quite a bit harder to explain and understand than the ones we like to call “Major Fun”.

And they usually take a couple of hours to play. Or more.
This is fine with me on occasion. But not what we here at MajorFun celebrate. 

We’re all about FUN. Simple. Joyous. Major. Fun. 

Now Uwe’s “PATCHWORK“is just that.

Major Fun awardIt takes 10 minutes or less to learn and around 25 or 30 to play. That’s it. You’re finished. And thinking about playing it again. Right away. It stimulates the mind. And the sense of touch as well. All those patches, of different shapes. Fitting together (hopefully).

And it’s PURRTTY!!! OH SO PURRTTY!!!!
Strategic too.
 A perfectly fun combination.
 A Gamer’s Game in the nicest sense of the word.

But I digress.

Patchwork is a two player game which, rumor has it, has a chance to possibly be played as solitaire, which is always nice.
Each player has her own 9X9 board to play on in addition to the center “time track” you’re both moving along.

track
In this game, buttons represent both the currency of the game (they’re used to buy patches) and victory points at games’ end. You want to have a bunch in your pile. And it’s very helpful to have them on the tiles you’ve placed on your player’s board.
Most buttons wins.

When it’s your turn, you have two options:

  • Buy a patch from the circle of tiles in the center of the table and place it on your board. This costs you buttons (money) and time.
  • Pass and move your marker to one space beyond your opponent’s. You get one button for every space you move when you do this.

Decisions decisions.

Imagination and planning play a part in Patchwork. First, in visualizing what your personal board will ultimately look like and second, leaving as few empty spaces as possible. (There’s a penalty for empty spaces at games end that’s drastic enough to frequently be the difference between winning and losing. So plan, baby plan).

patchwork in progress
The game continues, with players taking more of these beautiful patches and adding them to their personal board until both have reached the (final) center space on the time track.

When the second player reaches that final space, the game is over and both count the buttons they’ve accumulated and subtract two points for each uncovered space on their personal boards.

We like Patchwork a lot, hereabouts. And look forward to more (Major) Fun stuff from Uwe Rosenberg.

Sock Puppet Charades

Filed Under (Creative, Family Games, Party Games) by Bernie DeKoven on Apr 26, 2015

sock puppet charades

Sock Puppet Charades is, basically, when it comes down to it, charades, with sock puppets. How potentially droll, you say to yourself. Good game, that charades. Victorian, so they say. A Parlour game of proven play value. But with sock puppets! Those clever little hand puppets devised, I believe, sometime during the early 20th century and of similarly proven play value. A folk toy, one must say. Oh, my, how foreseeably fun. A folk game that makes the use of a folk toy. How doubly droll!

Well, my friend, until you play it, you can scarcely conjecture how beyond droll this little game of Sock Puppet Charades turns out to be. Scarcely. Because, you see, it’s far more than the sum of its play-tested parts. It’s a unique, entertaining and thoroughly enchanting game. Challenging (like charades). Tension-producing (there’s a sand-timer don’t you know). And yet, fundamentally funny (with sock puppets).

Take another look at the two sock puppets that come with the game.

sock puppet
They absolutely defy you to take anything seriously. Not when someone’s pinky and thumb are sticking out of the puppets pretending to be arms.

Now, imagine trying to use one or both of these sock puppets, without talking, with the aid only of the sock puppets, your vocabulary of vocal sound effects, and a small collection of props, to get someone to say the word “yoga.” Imagine trying to make yoga pose with your hand in a sock, you downward-facing dog, you.

The game itself is designed so that everybody is continually involved. One player dons the socks, selects the props, and then a charade card upon which are written 3 different words: an action, a person, and a thing. She now has exactly one minute to get the rest of the players to say all three words. The puppeteer gets one point for each person who correctly identifies the word. And the player who is first to guess correctly also gets a point. Then the next player dons the socks of puppeteerness. Depending on how many players there are (as few as three, as many as six) the game continues for four, three or two complete rounds before the final scores are calculated.

On the other hand, as it were, by the end of the game you have probably laughed so hard, so often, that the whole idea of keeping score kind of loses its point, so to speak.

Everything about the game is well-made. The box it comes in is sturdy enough to last a generation or two. You don’t have to worry about remembering the rules, or losing them, because they’re written right on the inside of the cover. The sock puppets are made of long-lasting knit polyester with embroidered faces. And the props, though the small collection truly demonstrates the play value of having them as part of the game, can be expanded upon indefinitely.

Brilliantly designed by Jack Degnan, diligently produced by the enticingly-named Marbles the Brain Store; Sock Puppet Charades, should you need to ask, is Major Fun!

party-family-creative

Coconuts “Crazy Monkey Game”

Filed Under (Dexterity, Family Games, Party Games) by Bernie DeKoven on Apr 22, 2015

Coconuts "Crazy Monkey" Game
So, let’s say you just bought your very own copy of the Coconuts “Crazy Monkey Game”. And you just opened the box.

There are monkeys in the box. Four of them. They all look the same and they all do the same thing. Their arms are stretched out, palms together. They’re spring-loaded. So if you press down on their arms, they go down, and if you let go, they spring up. So, what does that make you want to do with them? Put something in their palms, no? And press down maybe all the way, maybe only part of the way. And let their arms go. And watch the thing fly. Oh, yes!

If you rummage around a bit, you’ll notice a bag full of little brown rubbery things, about the size of Raisinets – you know, chocolate-covered raisins. If I were you and had the time, as soon as I got my Coconuts Crazy Monkey Game, I’d run over to the supermarket and buy a few boxes of those candies, or M&Ms maybe, because those little brown rubbery things they call coconuts look too delicious not to be edible, which, alas, they are not.

There are also cups in the box. Twelve of them. Four red, the rest yellow.

That, in fact, is all you actually and in truth need to know to have significant, genuine, generation-spanning, party-like fun with your Coconuts “Crazy Monkey Game”. And that, in truth, is what makes the Coconuts “Crazy Monkey Game” as major fun as it turns out being. You don’t really need to know how to play it. You can make up your own game. A truly fun, delicious game – party-worthy, for the whole family, even without the kids. Especially if you remembered to get the Raisinets. Though the little rubbery things do have an undeniable bounce to them, which adds that certain bounce to the gameplay of it all. But then you can’t eat your winnings.

Look a little further into the box and you’ll come up with four boards. This will change your perception of the game a bit, because it will make you wonder what to do with them. And, with a little more rummaging, you’ll find a deck of twelve “special magic cards.” And a set of, gasp, rules even.

So, you set the game up according to the instructions, until the whole thing looks something like this:

cocunut game
And no, I’m not going to tell you what the rules are, because: A) I don’t want to spoil the fun of your making up your own rules, and 2) the rules are pretty easy to understand. Especially if you watch this video:

YouTube Preview Image

And yes, yes, the game can be even more fun for a longer time (didn’t think it would be possible, did you?) with the board and the cards. All of which is to say, Major Fun? O, yes!

dexterity-family-kids-party

The Coconuts “Crazy Monkey Game” was designed by Walter Schneider and is brought to us by the compassionately playful folk of Mayday Games.

Red7

Filed Under (Family Games) by Marc Gilutin on Apr 21, 2015

As the Major knows, I’m frequently interested in the opportunity to mess with the rules (see Anti-Qwirkle)

I once asked game designer Dirk Henn about a house rule I’d come up with for his (classic!) game, Alhambra.

He said he liked the rule and went out of his way to tell me that any change to any game of his was fine as long as we were having fun. What more could a gamer ask for?

Love that guy!

red7

RED7 is a game for 2-4 fun people of, as the publisher suggests, age 9 and higher. YMMV. I think a lot of  8 yr olds will do fine. It was designed by Carl Chudyk and Chris Cieslik, with art by Alanna Cervenak and is made available by Asmadi Games.

The essence of the game is to be the last one standing.

In the very short version of the game, the winner is decided after one hand. 5-10 minutes. “That’s it. You win. Whadya wanna play now?”

We usually play what (LINK) Asmadi (LINK) calls the  “advanced rules”. But I promise you. None of the advanced rules are all that advanced. If you have the time, you should try them. ‘Cause more fun is better than less fun.

We usually choose the shorter version only if we’re using the game as a “summoner.”

Summoner? When two or more of us are here waiting for one or more of the others to arrive, we choose a game like Red7 to play and, as soon as more players arrive, we finish the hand we’re on and play something with the whole group.

(The thinking is that our starting a game without them magically “summons” them to show up already!)

Surprising how often this works.

Red7 is a game of cards, 1-7 of each of 7 colors. Suits if you will.

There are also personal cards to help each other to remember stuff.

red7-ontable

Game play

Seven cards are dealt to each player. Then one additional face up card in front of each to start their “Palette”.

The “Canvas” (In many card games, called  Discard) pile is then started with the special red card that says, “YOU ARE CURRENTLY PLAYING RED. HIGHEST CARD WINS”

Following that rule, the person to the left of the highest Palette card, goes first.

When it’s your turn, you have 4 choices

  1. Play a card to your “Palette” (As in painting, a “palette” is a place where the artist mixes her colors. How clever!)
  2. Play a card to the “Canvas” pile (Another artistic reference.)
    The top card on this pile always indicates what the current rule is.
  3. Do both 1 and 2. (The Palette card MUST be played first)
  4. Do nothing. And lose!! We all know what that means and like it much less than the alternative. Included in this rule is if you begin a round with no cards in your hand. If you can’t play, you lose.

The rest is simple. SO simple.

If, after you’ve played your card or cards, you’re winning, using the top discard as the rule, you continue.

If it’s Not, you throw all your cards in and “kibbitz” (special gaming term).

So what are these rules he’s been talking about?

There are 7 colors of cards. Each color presents a different rule, when played to the discard pile.

Red: High card wins. The highest card in each players “palette” is compared to the other players’ highest card. In the case of a tie, it’s broken by color in this order, from highest to lowest:

Ranking of colors is: Red, Orange, Yellow Green, Blue, Indigo, and Violet

RedGameplay

  • Orange: Most of one number Wins. Current player looks for her strongest combo. If she has three of a kind, she looks around the table to see if anyone has more or a higher set of trips.
  • Yellow: Most of One Color Wins
  • Green Most “Even” Cards Wins
  • Blue: Most Different Colors Wins
  • Indigo: Most Cards in a Row Wins
  • Violet: Most Cards Below 4 Wins

Tie Breakers are very important in this game, since you’re always comparing your hand to the other players’.

“Tie Breaker” is a very popular term in board games.

For example, a game ends in which  both you and I have met the requirements to win. But who wins? You? Me? Both of us??? (Some games actually suggest a shared victory, which is SO in the Major Fun Wheelhouse!!

But, most of the time, they’re looking for one winner and one or more tiebreakers are used to determine that luckiest of sons of guns.

Red7 actually has many tiebreakers built right into the game.

The first one is highest card. Then colors. Each player is given a card that shows the various card colors from the mighty RED (as in the title) to the lowly violet (Poor thing!)

So, if the “rule” is most of one color and you and I each have three of one color, we look for the highest card among the cards we’re comparing. High card wins. If we both have a 7, for instance, we use the color rule for breaking ties.

In Red7, a big part of the rules is “change the rules”. As you’ll see in a moment.

Every turn….or at least most of them…you may want to change a rule to better suit the cards  in your hand. Or to even have a legal play to make.}

I know you’ve been wondering about the “Advanced Rules”.

As I said, they’re not at all difficult.

Look here:

  • Major Fun awardOn the turns where you play a card to the Canvas pile, if the number on that card is greater than the number OF cards in your Palette, you get to pick an extra card from the deck. An extra card means more options when it’s your turn.
  • Keeping score.  In the advanced game, you’re playing more than one hand. when you win a hand, take all the cards in your Palette that helped you win (like a 4,5,6,7 when the rule was Indigo: Most cards in a row) and place them face down under your reference card. The face value of those cards represents your score for that hand.
  • When someone reaches 40 points in a 2-player game, or 35 in a 3, or 30 in a 4, the game’s over
  • Then everyone turns over their buried cards and totals them High total wins.

I TOLD you it was easy!!

And Fun!

Easy Fun!!

MAJOR FUN!!