MOX

Filed Under (Toys) by Bernie DeKoven on May 10, 2015

MOX

MOX is an elegant invitation to play, and whimsy, and laughter, and exploration, and shared silliness.

This is what MOX looks like when you make it laugh:

This is what it looks like when you turn it inside out:

And this, when it or you are feeling grumpy:

It’s such a simple toy, and it does so much. And anyone who is old enough to laugh can play with it, safely, alone, with other people who like to play.

It comes to us from one of my favorite toy designers, Alex Hochstrasser, whose company is called MOLUK.

I’ll let Alex explain:

Driven by a passion for great design, MOLUK strives to create innovative, sustainable products that don’t just entertain kids on a superficial level, but invite real interaction.

In a time where everything is getting more virtual, MOLUK offers toys that are totally manual, toys that get children to move and explore, toys that stimulate their senses and minds.

There are no ON and OFF switches, batteries or complicated instructions – MOLUK toys are powered simply by a child’s imagination.

MOLUK only collaborates with trusted manufacturing partners who share our values and deliver excellent, safe and long lasting products which are sold through a growing network of reliable and dedicated distribution partners around the world.

Major Fun Award

Wink

Filed Under (Party Games) by Will Bain on May 4, 2015

wink

Vigilance. Paranoia. Furtive glances.

Now that’s a party game.

Wink, by Blue Orange Games, is a cousin of the Assassination and Werewolf games that I played growing up. In these games there is someone who is “it” but is trying to keep the fact a secret. Someone else, the “inspector” or “detective,” is trying to find out who is it before it is too late. In Assassination, the “it” player tries to kill all the other players by winking at them before being identified by the “Inspector.” Wink takes this mechanic and makes everyone it.

It’s a brilliant move. One of the problems with Assassination-style games is that there are few Assassins, and that’s arguably the best role. Being a victim is only fun when you have a particularly dramatic death, but otherwise once you are eliminated, you might as well go out for coffee. Elimination games do not lend themselves as well to repeat play.

Using some cards and a pawn, Wink gives everyone a chance to be the Assassin AND the Inspector.

There are 2 decks of 36 cards called Face Cards. The cards are numbered 1-36. One deck is placed face-up on the table in a 6×6 grid. The other deck (identical to the first but with a different colored back) is dealt out to the players so that everyone has an equal number of Face Cards. Each person also has a colored pawn and 4 ACCUSE cards.

On your turn you take your pawn and place it on one of the face-up cards in the grid. You may not place your pawn on a number that matches one in your hand. You announce the number and then it is the next player’s turn.

But wait there’s more! The number you chose on the grid belongs to someone else at the table. That person wants to secretly indicate this to you with a wink. While everyone is taking turns placing their pawns on the grid, you are looking around the table for someone to wink at you. Chances are, you will also have to find the right moment to wink at someone who placed their pawn on one of your numbers.

But wait there’s more! If you observe someone winking at someone else, you may ACCUSE that person by playing one of your ACCUSE cards and shouting “J’Accuse!” in your best French accent (or worst as was often the case).

Points are awarded by collecting the Face Cards. After you first placed your pawn, when your turn comes around again, you must guess who has the card matching your number. If you are lucky then you saw that person wink at you. If you are correct, you keep the card under your pawn and the other person keeps the card in their hand. That’s one point for each of you. If your guess is wrong, the card under your pawn is turned face-down and you move your pawn to another card in the grid. You may also earn points by successfully ACCUSING someone. If you shout J’ACCUSE and are successful you get both cards (the one from the grid and the one from the player’s hand). You only have 4 ACCUSE cards so you have to use them wisely. Unused ACCUSE cards are worth 1 point at the end but a successful ACCUSE is worth 2 points (plus you rob your opponents).

We played with 8 people and although I was good at winking at my partners without being seen, I was TERRIBLE at witnessing winks. On the other hand, my neighbor (the guy who won) was terrifying in his ability to successfully ACCUSE. I thought with 8 people I would catch at least one furtive wink but it was very difficult.

Major Fun awardVery nerve wracking.

And Major Fun.

Everyone is always engaged. Right up to the end of the game. There is no elimination and no down time. ACCUSING is incredibly entertaining and is definitely the best part of the game (especially when you are successful). I’ve mentioned it before in reviews that many of the best Major Fun games have a little meanness embedded in them and Wink accomplishes this perfectly with the ACCUSE mechanic.

4 – 8 players. Ages 8+

Wink was designed by Fred Krahwinkel and is © 2015 by Blue Orange Games.

Patchwork

Filed Under (Thinking Games) by Marc Gilutin on Apr 27, 2015

Agricola, Ora et Labora, Le Havre, Glass Road……..Whew!

Uwe Rosenberg has become one of the best designers of the ‘heavier’ games of the current generation. Four games in the top forty, as rated by us (you, if you’re registered on Board Game Geek) is downright Beatlesque, as far as world domination goes.

But as good as these games are, none of them will be getting a Major Fun Award any time soon.

Not because they’re not terrific. Herr Rosenberg does great work.
But they are quite a bit harder to explain and understand than the ones we like to call “Major Fun”.

And they usually take a couple of hours to play. Or more.
This is fine with me on occasion. But not what we here at MajorFun celebrate. 

We’re all about FUN. Simple. Joyous. Major. Fun. 

Now Uwe’s “PATCHWORK“is just that.

Major Fun awardIt takes 10 minutes or less to learn and around 25 or 30 to play. That’s it. You’re finished. And thinking about playing it again. Right away. It stimulates the mind. And the sense of touch as well. All those patches, of different shapes. Fitting together (hopefully).

And it’s PURRTTY!!! OH SO PURRTTY!!!!
Strategic too.
 A perfectly fun combination.
 A Gamer’s Game in the nicest sense of the word.

But I digress.

Patchwork is a two player game which, rumor has it, has a chance to possibly be played as solitaire, which is always nice.
Each player has her own 9X9 board to play on in addition to the center “time track” you’re both moving along.

track
In this game, buttons represent both the currency of the game (they’re used to buy patches) and victory points at games’ end. You want to have a bunch in your pile. And it’s very helpful to have them on the tiles you’ve placed on your player’s board.
Most buttons wins.

When it’s your turn, you have two options:

  • Buy a patch from the circle of tiles in the center of the table and place it on your board. This costs you buttons (money) and time.
  • Pass and move your marker to one space beyond your opponent’s. You get one button for every space you move when you do this.

Decisions decisions.

Imagination and planning play a part in Patchwork. First, in visualizing what your personal board will ultimately look like and second, leaving as few empty spaces as possible. (There’s a penalty for empty spaces at games end that’s drastic enough to frequently be the difference between winning and losing. So plan, baby plan).

patchwork in progress
The game continues, with players taking more of these beautiful patches and adding them to their personal board until both have reached the (final) center space on the time track.

When the second player reaches that final space, the game is over and both count the buttons they’ve accumulated and subtract two points for each uncovered space on their personal boards.

We like Patchwork a lot, hereabouts. And look forward to more (Major) Fun stuff from Uwe Rosenberg.

Sock Puppet Charades

Filed Under (Creative, Family Games, Party Games) by Bernie DeKoven on Apr 26, 2015

sock puppet charades

Sock Puppet Charades is, basically, when it comes down to it, charades, with sock puppets. How potentially droll, you say to yourself. Good game, that charades. Victorian, so they say. A Parlour game of proven play value. But with sock puppets! Those clever little hand puppets devised, I believe, sometime during the early 20th century and of similarly proven play value. A folk toy, one must say. Oh, my, how foreseeably fun. A folk game that makes the use of a folk toy. How doubly droll!

Well, my friend, until you play it, you can scarcely conjecture how beyond droll this little game of Sock Puppet Charades turns out to be. Scarcely. Because, you see, it’s far more than the sum of its play-tested parts. It’s a unique, entertaining and thoroughly enchanting game. Challenging (like charades). Tension-producing (there’s a sand-timer don’t you know). And yet, fundamentally funny (with sock puppets).

Take another look at the two sock puppets that come with the game.

sock puppet
They absolutely defy you to take anything seriously. Not when someone’s pinky and thumb are sticking out of the puppets pretending to be arms.

Now, imagine trying to use one or both of these sock puppets, without talking, with the aid only of the sock puppets, your vocabulary of vocal sound effects, and a small collection of props, to get someone to say the word “yoga.” Imagine trying to make yoga pose with your hand in a sock, you downward-facing dog, you.

The game itself is designed so that everybody is continually involved. One player dons the socks, selects the props, and then a charade card upon which are written 3 different words: an action, a person, and a thing. She now has exactly one minute to get the rest of the players to say all three words. The puppeteer gets one point for each person who correctly identifies the word. And the player who is first to guess correctly also gets a point. Then the next player dons the socks of puppeteerness. Depending on how many players there are (as few as three, as many as six) the game continues for four, three or two complete rounds before the final scores are calculated.

On the other hand, as it were, by the end of the game you have probably laughed so hard, so often, that the whole idea of keeping score kind of loses its point, so to speak.

Everything about the game is well-made. The box it comes in is sturdy enough to last a generation or two. You don’t have to worry about remembering the rules, or losing them, because they’re written right on the inside of the cover. The sock puppets are made of long-lasting knit polyester with embroidered faces. And the props, though the small collection truly demonstrates the play value of having them as part of the game, can be expanded upon indefinitely.

Brilliantly designed by Jack Degnan, diligently produced by the enticingly-named Marbles the Brain Store; Sock Puppet Charades, should you need to ask, is Major Fun!

party-family-creative

Coconuts “Crazy Monkey Game”

Filed Under (Dexterity, Family Games, Party Games) by Bernie DeKoven on Apr 22, 2015

Coconuts "Crazy Monkey" Game
So, let’s say you just bought your very own copy of the Coconuts “Crazy Monkey Game”. And you just opened the box.

There are monkeys in the box. Four of them. They all look the same and they all do the same thing. Their arms are stretched out, palms together. They’re spring-loaded. So if you press down on their arms, they go down, and if you let go, they spring up. So, what does that make you want to do with them? Put something in their palms, no? And press down maybe all the way, maybe only part of the way. And let their arms go. And watch the thing fly. Oh, yes!

If you rummage around a bit, you’ll notice a bag full of little brown rubbery things, about the size of Raisinets – you know, chocolate-covered raisins. If I were you and had the time, as soon as I got my Coconuts Crazy Monkey Game, I’d run over to the supermarket and buy a few boxes of those candies, or M&Ms maybe, because those little brown rubbery things they call coconuts look too delicious not to be edible, which, alas, they are not.

There are also cups in the box. Twelve of them. Four red, the rest yellow.

That, in fact, is all you actually and in truth need to know to have significant, genuine, generation-spanning, party-like fun with your Coconuts “Crazy Monkey Game”. And that, in truth, is what makes the Coconuts “Crazy Monkey Game” as major fun as it turns out being. You don’t really need to know how to play it. You can make up your own game. A truly fun, delicious game – party-worthy, for the whole family, even without the kids. Especially if you remembered to get the Raisinets. Though the little rubbery things do have an undeniable bounce to them, which adds that certain bounce to the gameplay of it all. But then you can’t eat your winnings.

Look a little further into the box and you’ll come up with four boards. This will change your perception of the game a bit, because it will make you wonder what to do with them. And, with a little more rummaging, you’ll find a deck of twelve “special magic cards.” And a set of, gasp, rules even.

So, you set the game up according to the instructions, until the whole thing looks something like this:

cocunut game
And no, I’m not going to tell you what the rules are, because: A) I don’t want to spoil the fun of your making up your own rules, and 2) the rules are pretty easy to understand. Especially if you watch this video:

YouTube Preview Image

And yes, yes, the game can be even more fun for a longer time (didn’t think it would be possible, did you?) with the board and the cards. All of which is to say, Major Fun? O, yes!

dexterity-family-kids-party

The Coconuts “Crazy Monkey Game” was designed by Walter Schneider and is brought to us by the compassionately playful folk of Mayday Games.

Red7

Filed Under (Family Games) by Marc Gilutin on Apr 21, 2015

As the Major knows, I’m frequently interested in the opportunity to mess with the rules (see Anti-Qwirkle)

I once asked game designer Dirk Henn about a house rule I’d come up with for his (classic!) game, Alhambra.

He said he liked the rule and went out of his way to tell me that any change to any game of his was fine as long as we were having fun. What more could a gamer ask for?

Love that guy!

red7

RED7 is a game for 2-4 fun people of, as the publisher suggests, age 9 and higher. YMMV. I think a lot of  8 yr olds will do fine. It was designed by Carl Chudyk and Chris Cieslik, with art by Alanna Cervenak and is made available by Asmadi Games.

The essence of the game is to be the last one standing.

In the very short version of the game, the winner is decided after one hand. 5-10 minutes. “That’s it. You win. Whadya wanna play now?”

We usually play what (LINK) Asmadi (LINK) calls the  “advanced rules”. But I promise you. None of the advanced rules are all that advanced. If you have the time, you should try them. ‘Cause more fun is better than less fun.

We usually choose the shorter version only if we’re using the game as a “summoner.”

Summoner? When two or more of us are here waiting for one or more of the others to arrive, we choose a game like Red7 to play and, as soon as more players arrive, we finish the hand we’re on and play something with the whole group.

(The thinking is that our starting a game without them magically “summons” them to show up already!)

Surprising how often this works.

Red7 is a game of cards, 1-7 of each of 7 colors. Suits if you will.

There are also personal cards to help each other to remember stuff.

red7-ontable

Game play

Seven cards are dealt to each player. Then one additional face up card in front of each to start their “Palette”.

The “Canvas” (In many card games, called  Discard) pile is then started with the special red card that says, “YOU ARE CURRENTLY PLAYING RED. HIGHEST CARD WINS”

Following that rule, the person to the left of the highest Palette card, goes first.

When it’s your turn, you have 4 choices

  1. Play a card to your “Palette” (As in painting, a “palette” is a place where the artist mixes her colors. How clever!)
  2. Play a card to the “Canvas” pile (Another artistic reference.)
    The top card on this pile always indicates what the current rule is.
  3. Do both 1 and 2. (The Palette card MUST be played first)
  4. Do nothing. And lose!! We all know what that means and like it much less than the alternative. Included in this rule is if you begin a round with no cards in your hand. If you can’t play, you lose.

The rest is simple. SO simple.

If, after you’ve played your card or cards, you’re winning, using the top discard as the rule, you continue.

If it’s Not, you throw all your cards in and “kibbitz” (special gaming term).

So what are these rules he’s been talking about?

There are 7 colors of cards. Each color presents a different rule, when played to the discard pile.

Red: High card wins. The highest card in each players “palette” is compared to the other players’ highest card. In the case of a tie, it’s broken by color in this order, from highest to lowest:

Ranking of colors is: Red, Orange, Yellow Green, Blue, Indigo, and Violet

RedGameplay

  • Orange: Most of one number Wins. Current player looks for her strongest combo. If she has three of a kind, she looks around the table to see if anyone has more or a higher set of trips.
  • Yellow: Most of One Color Wins
  • Green Most “Even” Cards Wins
  • Blue: Most Different Colors Wins
  • Indigo: Most Cards in a Row Wins
  • Violet: Most Cards Below 4 Wins

Tie Breakers are very important in this game, since you’re always comparing your hand to the other players’.

“Tie Breaker” is a very popular term in board games.

For example, a game ends in which  both you and I have met the requirements to win. But who wins? You? Me? Both of us??? (Some games actually suggest a shared victory, which is SO in the Major Fun Wheelhouse!!

But, most of the time, they’re looking for one winner and one or more tiebreakers are used to determine that luckiest of sons of guns.

Red7 actually has many tiebreakers built right into the game.

The first one is highest card. Then colors. Each player is given a card that shows the various card colors from the mighty RED (as in the title) to the lowly violet (Poor thing!)

So, if the “rule” is most of one color and you and I each have three of one color, we look for the highest card among the cards we’re comparing. High card wins. If we both have a 7, for instance, we use the color rule for breaking ties.

In Red7, a big part of the rules is “change the rules”. As you’ll see in a moment.

Every turn….or at least most of them…you may want to change a rule to better suit the cards  in your hand. Or to even have a legal play to make.}

I know you’ve been wondering about the “Advanced Rules”.

As I said, they’re not at all difficult.

Look here:

  • Major Fun awardOn the turns where you play a card to the Canvas pile, if the number on that card is greater than the number OF cards in your Palette, you get to pick an extra card from the deck. An extra card means more options when it’s your turn.
  • Keeping score.  In the advanced game, you’re playing more than one hand. when you win a hand, take all the cards in your Palette that helped you win (like a 4,5,6,7 when the rule was Indigo: Most cards in a row) and place them face down under your reference card. The face value of those cards represents your score for that hand.
  • When someone reaches 40 points in a 2-player game, or 35 in a 3, or 30 in a 4, the game’s over
  • Then everyone turns over their buried cards and totals them High total wins.

I TOLD you it was easy!!

And Fun!

Easy Fun!!

MAJOR FUN!!

Laser Maze, Jr.

Filed Under (Kids Games, Puzzles) by Bernie DeKoven on Apr 14, 2015

laser maze jr

Laser Maze, Jr is “Junior” only because, unlike it’s Major Fun award-winning parent, Laser Maze (senior?) (which you can now play online):

  • the laser is safely secured to the puzzle frame, hence avoiding accidental lasering of eyes and things
  • there are 40 puzzles instead of 60, though the puzzles span four levels of difficulty, many of which are difficult enough to confound your local non-juniors
  • the puzzles are on large cards which fit beneath the top stage of the frame so as to make it easier to know precisely how to set up each puzzle
  • there’s a space fantasy theme to the whole game
  • it says “Jr” so you know it’s supposed to be for kids
  • the puzzle frame is exceptionally sturdy, the base flared for even more stability

The two “rocket target” pieces reflect the laser into their tops, causing the whole piece to glow when hit by the laser – a very rewarding reinforcement for any junior puzzle-solver. Yes, the more complex puzzles, with all their reflections and refractions, result in a somewhat more subtle rocket glow – but still wonderfully satisfying. The challenge cards are ingeniously designed – the part that shows you where to put the pieces at the onset of the puzzle sliding under the grid so as to be perfectly aligned and very easy to follow. The challenge part is indicated on the tab, showing clearly which pieces need to be added in order to complete the solution. The cards are two-sided, each side showing another puzzle. The solutions are all in the accompanying booklet, and are shown graphically, so no reading is required.

Here, from the puzzle’s producer, ThinkFun, (who has brought to us so many Major Fun-worth puzzles) a brief explanatory video:

YouTube Preview Image

Two triple-AAA batteries, not included. Yes. Not.

Invented by Luke Hooper – the same who invented the other Laser Maze puzzle, and The Laser Game: Khet, with the challenge cards designed by Wei-Hwa Huang. As you probably guessed, it’s all Major Fun (and not just for Juniors).

puzzles-kids

Diamonds

Filed Under (Family Games, Thinking Games) by Will Bain on Apr 14, 2015

Tagged Under : , , ,

diamondsA good deal of my down time in college was spent playing card games. At lunch we would play Hearts and Euchre. After dinner we played Spades and Bridge. And during [Post-Colonial Comparative Ontological Super-Symmetry] lectures we played a raucous home-brewed game that combined the best elements of Speed, Pit, and what we called “Go Fish Yourself.” We never actually went to class so please feel free to insert any course title inside the brackets.

Had Diamonds existed 25 years ago, I feel confident in saying that we would have welcomed it into our busy schedule of card games, role-playing games, board games, and video games. Even now, when I find myself a putative adult with parenting and career responsibilities, I would gladly make time for a game or two of Diamonds. It has nice strategic depth like Spades and just a little meanness like Hearts.

In short, Diamonds is a trick-taking card game. The deck consists of 60 cards divided into the four traditional suits: Clubs, Spades, Hearts, and Diamonds. One player leads a card and the others follow suit if they can. The highest value card of the lead suit wins the trick. There is no trump suit.

The game comes with a big mound of plastic gems that are piled in the center of the table (called “The Supply”). Players earn diamond tokens each trick and these diamonds determine the player’s score at the end of the hand. Diamonds can be stored in one of two places: behind a small screen called “The Vault” or in front of the screen called “The Showroom.” At the end of the hand, gems in the Showroom are worth 1 point each and gems in the Vault are worth 2 points apiece. How you earn the gems and how they come to be in your Showroom or Vault is the clever aspect of this game.

Each suit allows you to take an action that will help you accumulate diamonds. The diamond suit allows you to take one gem from the supply and put it in your Vault. Hearts allow you to take one from the supply and put it in your Showroom. Spades allow you to move a gem from your Showroom to your Vault. Clubs allow you to steal a gem from another player’s Showroom and place it in your Showroom.

You get to use these actions in several situations. If you win the trick (you have the highest card of the lead suit) you get to take the action. If you do not have the lead suit and must play something else then you also get to take that card action. For example, if I lead Hearts and you don’t have one, you can play a Diamond and then take a gem from the supply (putting it in your Vault). At the end of the hand, players count up how many cards they have of each suit. The player with the highest in each suit also gets to take that action. Finally, if you take no cards (no tricks) the entire hand, you may take 2 gems from the Supply and put them in your Vault. You can earn a lot of points this way.

01 AwardOne of the things we really like about the game Diamonds is that you almost always score something during a hand. Heck, several players can score in the same trick. It is very difficult to play a hand and score nothing. As a way of keeping players involved and invested, this is brilliant. There is also a great tension that builds through the game because you might not know how many gems a player has behind the screen.

As is suggested by the name, the suit of diamonds is the best suit as it allows you to put gems directly in your vault; however, the other suits are effective and fun and make for exciting gameplay. In a four-player game, only 40 cards are dealt so it is possible that there might not be many diamond cards in circulation. If that’s the case, hearts and clubs are the only way to earn gems and you need spades to get them safely into your Vault. And because we at Major Fun have mean little hearts, there was a good deal of glee had when we could use clubs to steal diamonds from each other.

Diamonds is a Major Fun twist on standard card games. It is certainly the safest way to be a diamond thief.

2 – 6 players. Ages 8+

Diamonds was designed by Mike Fitzgerald and is © 2014 by Stronghold Games LLC.

Jenga® Giant™

Filed Under (Dexterity, Family Games, Party Games) by Bernie DeKoven on Apr 13, 2015

Jenga Giant
Jenga® Giant™ is, as you might conclude, a giant version of Jenga. You play it just like you’d play Jenga®. Everything you know about Jenga® makes this game as fun as it is. Only with Jenga Giant the fun is, shall we say, even more major.

Why even more major? Because when those blocks come a-tumblin’ down, man, do they come a-tumblin’! We’re talking loud. We’re talking spectacularly loud. By the second or third time you play, and you know full well how much of a spectacle it is, and how loud it is, the tension is even greater, the game even that much more exciting, and attractive, which makes it especially good for parties.

It is made of “54 precision crafted polished Jenga® Giant™ Premium Hardwood Blocks each 6″x2″x1″” (premium hardwood, but not from endangered rain forest, jungle, or similar areas). This “precision crafted polished” feature of the game is what makes it work so well, and why you could very well drive yourself beyond the limits of the home craftperson should you try to make your own. Blocks that can slide without making the whole thing fall are blocks that slide the way only a precision crafted polished block could slide – smoothly, smugly, validating your Jenga-like acumen.

There is nothing cheap about Jenga Giant. Nothing. But after you play it at one or several of your parties, you’ll have no trouble at all justifying the expense. And neither will your guests.

To further the party-like aspect of Jenga Giant, and for a relatively minuscule investment, consider purchasing a ChalkInk marker so that you can write messages, erasably, in a subtle but clearly legible white, right upon your beautiful Jenga blocks, added rules and other hilarity-provoking things. We take, for example, from The Big List of Drinking Jenga Tiles (not that drinking is necessary or even essential for the majority of the added fun):

  • The next person must take their turn sitting on your lap.
  • You must play the rest of the game wearing no shoes or socks.
  • You must keep physical contact with the person to your right for the remainder of the game.
  • Any time you sing the Jeopardy theme song, the person taking their turn must complete their turn before you finish the song.

(Fortunately, the Jenga Giant blocks are giant enough for just about any message you can think of.)

The only reason we don’t recommend Jenga Giant for kids? Kids might get a bit too carried away to remember not to play near fragile things like on your beautiful dining room table or too close to the proverbial china closet. O, they will have fun. Big fun. But there are times when one must ask: what price fun?

dexterity-party

The Metagame

Filed Under (Party Games, Word Games) by Bernie DeKoven on Apr 13, 2015

metaga.me

The Metagame, explain the triumvirate at Local # 12,

“is a social card game about everything: comics and literature, fine art and tv, architecture and videogames. It’s a way to show off your cultural smarts and get into ridiculous arguments with your friends. Arguments like:

  • Which feels like first love: Pride and Prejudice or Hungry Hungry Hippos?
  • Which is responsible for the fraying of our moral fabric: Tupperware or Das Kapital?
  • Which should be required in schools: Dungeons and Dragons or the Bible?

“The Metagame is not a single game or a single set of rules. Like a traditional deck of cards, it’s an open game system enabling a wide variety of games for different settings and play styles.”

Before I begin to wax enthusiastic about The Metagame and all the joyous socio-conceptual affordances thereof, I needs must recuse myself. I know the guy. Eric Zimmerman. He is my friend and has catalyzed something like a renaissance of my work. So I really want to aid his success as much as he has aided mine.  On the other hand, as an advocate of good games, and real fun, I can’t keep myself, or you, from the many wonders of the Metagame.

There are six games. Each is different. Each is will make you laugh. There are games that are strong enough to engage a party-full of friends, and games that you can play with your lover – or a several of your lovers. The cards are very well thought out – all of them. Which is no small achievement, considering how many cards there are to think about.

Here’s a great little video on how to play the game:

And another, earlier one, with the inventors of the game, at a slightly earlier stage.

Here’s our review of the game at an earlier stage.

Here’s how you can buy the finished, packaged game in all it’s many glories.

And here’s our award:

Major Fun Award