The Mind

The Mind   NSV |  BGG  |  Buy

Designer: Wolfgang Warsch
Publisher: NSV, Pandasaurus
2-4 players 15 minutes ages 8+
MSRP $15

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Have you ever been in The Zone? Maybe you found it playing music. Everyone in the orchestra playing in perfect time. That pure sweet sound is impossible to forget. Or you found it on the basketball court – each teammate anticipating the moves of the next – it’s like poetry – no one can stop you and no one can miss. It’s special, being in The Zone – a moment of perfect harmony – being totally in synch with everyone around you. Special because The Zone is so hard to find and special because it’s so hard to stay in The Zone once you do! If you get there even for a few fleeting seconds, it’s like magic. The Zone leaves its mark on you and you’ll strive to find it again and again.

The Mind is a cooperative card game that wants its players to find The Zone…and stay there as long as they can! Over the course of several rounds, your team must find a common wavelength to play numbered cards in order to a single stack hoping to reach your goal.

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The Mind has a deck of 100 cards numbered 1-100.

There are also 5 life cards and 3 throwing star cards.

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The Mind is played over 8, 10, or 12 rounds, depending on the number of players. The goal for your team is to reach the end of the final round with at least one life remaining. If your team runs out of lives, you lose.

In round one, each player gets one card. Round two, two cards and so on. A round ends when all cards have been played.

One at a time, players will add a single card to a central stack, trying to play all cards in ascending numerical order a la Solitaire.

We’re in Round 2. My hand is 8, 22. Your hand is 15, 73. We want to the stack to go 8-15-22-73. If a card is played out of order, any cards skipped over are shown, discarded, and the team loses a life.

Beyond simple, right? And, yes, even now I can sense some eyes rolling.

But there’s one key element I have yet to mention and this is….

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While playing The Mind, you cannot communicate verbally with your teammates! You cannot indicate the numbers on your cards with gestures or sounds! You must communicate mentally with your teammates and find a way to play every card dealt out for the round in order to the stack.

It will seem crazy at first – perhaps to the point that you might question whether this is actually a game.

But then it will happen. Your team will find The Zone. Somehow, some way, your team will navigate through a minefield of consecutive cards. I play the 68, followed by 69 and 70 from the next two players and you’ll feel the magic. When, not if, this happens, there will be smiles and cheers all around.

How does this happen? What transforms The Mind from a game of Silent Solitaire to a game of telepathic synchronicity?

The Mind asks you to play based on reading your fellow players and not the cards.

While direct communication isn’t allowed, we all transmit a wealth of subtle social clues and cues. The closer we all pay attention to what is happening at the table, the more we are able to observe and interpret. It’s like a new language your team creates and learns as you play.

A subtle glance from the player to your left. A nuanced placement of cards from the player on your right. These things take on meaning and help your team connect and occasionally find The Zone. And when you do, win or lose, there are few feelings better to experience at the game table.

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The Mind is fueled by a powerful kind of playfulness – the joy of playing together in harmony, in synch. Each new game and each new team will present a new set of challenges, a new language to learn, a new opportunity to create those moments where everything lines up. And even when it all goes horribly wrong. No, especially because things often go horribly wrong, it makes those moments in The Zone ones you’ll remember long after you leave the table. Simple, ingenious, and consistently compelling, The Mind drills deep into the essence of Major Fun.

Special Note:

This review appears in the Fall 2018 issue of Casual Game Insider Magazine.

CGI publishes a wonderful selection of articles and reviews on a quarterly basis.  In 2019, a Major Fun review will be featured in the next several issues.

The Spiel, Major Fun and CGI share a common goal: opening doors to the wider world of play. We hope this cross promotion will invite more people into the game community.

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Flamme Rouge & Peloton

Flamme Rouge   Stronghold Games  | LautepelitBGG  |  Buy

Designer: Asger Harding Granerud
Artist: Ossi Hiekkala
Publisher: Stronghold Games, Lautepelit
2-6 players 30-45 minutes ages 8+
MSRP $60 (base game) / $40 (Peloton)

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You’re a cyclist pedaling through the pack, hurtling over hills, around corners, sweat soaking through your jersey when you see it, a flash of color – a signal – THE signal that the real race is on. The red flag, the Flamme Rouge, means only one kilometer separates you from the finish line. Can you fight off exhaustion and challenges from other cyclists to maneuver your team using two decks of cards to take the lead in the final stretch?

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Flamme Rouge is a race game with a modular board. There are 21 track boards that fit together in dozens of different configurations to form race courses. There are six suggested layouts included but once you’re familiar with the game, you could build your own tracks, too. The track boards include straightaways and curves both sharp and soft. The Peloton Expansion adds 9 more boards with new terrain elements, like hills and cobblestone paths.

Each player controls two colorful cyclists in the game: a Sprinteur and a Rouleur. And each cyclist has its own detailed miniature.

Each cyclist has a corresponding deck of numbered energy cards tailored to that cycilist’s abilities.

The Sprinteur, you guessed it, sprints, so his or her deck has more high and low valued energy (movement) cards. The Rouleur is the steady workhorse, so his or her deck has more cards in the middle range.

The Peloton expansion adds pawns and cards for two additional players so 6 people can play.

There are also corresponding exhaustion cards for each type of deck. You’ll want to avoid these when you can, but it’s almost inevitable you’ll get tired as the race charges on.

Each player has a personal board which has a space for each cyclist’s deck and a notched space indicating where cards should be played.

To begin, simply build a track from the guides included, shuffle each deck and place it on your personal board. Assign starting positions and you’re ready to race!

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The goal in Flamme Rouge is to get one of your cyclists across the finish line first

Each player has two separate decks, one for each cyclist, so you’ll be cycling (yes, pun intended!) through two different decks on each turn of the game.

The flow of a turn is very simple. Pick one of your cyclists. Draw four cards from that cyclist’s deck.

Select one card from your hand and place it face down to your personal board. The cards you didnt pick go face up at the bottom of the chosen cyclist’s deck.

Reveal all cards and move the selected cyclist the number of spaces indicated. The bike closest to the lead moves first.

If you’re in the clear, it’s smooth sailing. You can even move through spaces with other players since bikes are small but you can never end up in an occupied space. If you’re blocked, you will lose the extra movement. After you finish movement your bike slides to the right most lane when possible.

After each player has moved one of his or her cyclists, repeat the same process with the other cyclist. Draw 4 cards, pick one secretly. Reveal and move each cyclist starting with the front runner. Cards not used go face up on the bottom of the deck.

Choose a bike, choose 1 of 4 cards, move that bike the number of spaces indicated on the card. That’s the essence of Flamme Rouge.

At the end of a turn, we check to see if there are any packs of cyclists able to slipstream and catch up with the group in front of it. A pack can be as few as a single cyclist or several provided they are all adjacent to each other. A pack that is separated by exactly one empty square space moves forward to form a larger pack.

Now look at this pack and see if there is a pack in front of it that is separated by exactly one square space on the track. The result is: it is often very difficult to separate yourself from the pack as the race moves forward. If a pack can stay within a single square, it can reel you in!

This is the main flow of the game. But there’s one element left that will inform every decision you make. Exhaustion.

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Exhaustion is what sets this game apart! The race in Flamme Rouge is driven by a curious kind of deck building.

What’s deck building? It is a mechanism that first came to life in a game called Dominion and has since found its way into hundreds if not thousands of games over the past decade.

A core element in deck building is that players begin the game with identical decks of cards and the decisions a player makes will change the makeup of his or her deck. This means, for good or ill, each deck will diverge and become an expression of each player’s choices.

It is probably more accurate to call Flamme Rouge a deck preservation game instead of a deck building game, because each card you choose to play is removed from the game!

Your Sprinteur rockets down the board with a 9 energy card? Great. Enjoy it. But that 9 is now gone, never to return. And you only have so many 9s available.

So a key decision point each round isn’t simply to find the highest number in your hand, it’s how and when to preserve some of the higher numbers by NOT playing them so you’ll have them to use later on.

You have to manage your energy as the race moves on or run the risk of running low just when you need it the most.

And here comes exhaustion to make this decision even more challenging

At the end of each turn, after playing cards and after slipstreaming to bring packs together, we look at the board and see which cyclists have open spaces in front of them. The leader or leaders at the very front of the race will, of course, have empty spaces in front of them. BUT if the cyclists have spread out, there may be others throughout the track with open spaces facing them. Each cyclist like this must draw an exhaustion card and place it in his or her deck.

Exhaustion cards are all ranked 2, the lowest cards in the game.

This means the longer you are in the lead, the more tired you get. The more tired you get the more exhaustion cards become part of your deck. Of course, at the same time you’re spending higher ranked cards that are permanently leaving your deck, too.

That makes Flamme Rouge a game of exquisite balance.

You dont really want the lead but you want to be close to the lead. You can’t play too cautiously or you’ll lose the main pack and get exhausted just trying to keep up! Even deciding which cyclist to move first can become deliciously tricky since you might be able to help each other out or you might be able to cause problems for others when moved in the right sequence.

Such a rich and rewarding challenge confronts you from the moment you see that red flag waving. Deciding how to preserve your energy, your cards, becomes the main goal at some point BUT knowing when to spend it is just as important if you’re going to make a push to finish first.

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Without the Peloton expansion, Flamme Rouge is a worthy recipient of the Major Fun Award Since it relies on such simple actions and decisions, you can teach it to a wonderfully wide range of players, regardless of experience. Draw 4 cards, pick one, move that number of spaces. Check for slipstreaming. Then anyone with open spaces in front takes an exhaustion card. There’s the game in a nutshell. You can start playing without even knowing or appreciating it’s subtle emphasis on balance and you’ll see how that game will reel everyone in for a fun and exciting finish. 

But Flamme Rouge is also a game that will open up to more thoughtful and strategic decisions the more you play.

With the addition of the Peloton, Flamme Rouge also earns our Spiel of Approval! There are now track spaces with additional considerations to factor in. Cobblestones add chokepoints to the track which create a race within the race to avoid getting blocked or slowed down. There are rules for breakaways, building your own tracks and adding a peloton and muscle team to the race, driven by a simple set of AI rules. None of these elements clutter the game. They only serve to enhance the experience and make it a more rich experience for those who want to explore it more. You can even split up the teams of cyclists to allow 12 players in one race!

Flamme Rouge is a wonderful investment for many different kinds of fun. This is a rare find indeed. It retains its core identity as a beautifully simple race game built around balance: when to reserve and when to spend your energy. And the more you play, the more you can change the game to suit your mood or your playstyle or the people you’re playing with. And each time the game will give back to you in a new way.

The race game as a general concept is one that any player will understand almost instinctually. The most common image you might conjure up when someone says board game is a simple track with pawns racing to the get to the end. Flamme Rouge manages to find its own balance between this childhood classic and the world of modern games. Just like the cyclists in the game, the game itself tries to preserve simplicity of gameplay while providing players with the motivation to dig deeper and explore its subtleties. You dont need to win every race or any race when you play Flamme Rouge to discover the fun it offers. And that’s the kind of beautiful balance each of our awards strives to celebrate!

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Maki Stack

Release: 10/2/2018    Download:  Enhanced  | MP3
Run Time: 89 min    Subscribe:  Enhanced  | MP3 | RSS

Mom told you, don’t play with your food.

Maki Stack says forget that.

Sushi isn’t just delicious ; it’s fun to build towers with it, too!

Using your fingers like chopsticks, listen close and see if you can stack your wooden maki faster than the other team.

Then try it blindfolded!

So much Major Fun packed into a simple set of blocks and cards.

Listen in for a full review and discussion.

Maki Stack

BGG  |  Blue Orange  |  Buy

Designer: Jeff Lai

Artist: Stéphane Escapa

Publisher: Blue Orange

2-6 players  10-15 minutes   ages 7+   MSRP $25

For info on the Game Night Grab Bag segments featured on the show, check out the show notes at The Spiel!

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Music credits include:

Black Room  by Jun Mayuzumi   |   the song

Ye Ye  by Shuri Eiko   |   the song

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Drop It

Drop It   Kosmos  |  Kosmos & Thames  | BGG  |  Buy

Designer: Bernhard Lach, Uwe Rapp
Publisher: Kosmos, Thames & Kosmos
2-4 players 20 minutes ages 8+
MSRP $30

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The name says it all. Gravity is your friend and enemy in this game. Take turns dropping wooden pieces between two clear panes. Some areas you want to avoid; others, you’ll cash in for big points. The player best able to bend the laws of physics to his or her service will win the game.

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Even from across the room, Drop It makes an impression.

It becomes a beautiful mosaic of shapes and colors as you play. The main component of the game is a vertical game board which stands over 12” tall.

The board is two panes of clear plastic with a gap wide enough to accommodate the 36 colorful wooden player pieces. Slanted lines separate the plastic panes into distinct areas (drop zones) and each drop zone has a semi-opaque dot. There are additional slots on the sides and at the bottom for double sided landing zone boards.

Each player begins with 9 wooden pieces in bright primary colors: 3 circles, 2 squares, 2 diamonds and 2 triangles.

There’s also a score board and markers for each player color.

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Pick a piece and drop it into the game board. If all goes well, that piece will score. That’s what you’ll do each turn. Do this alternating between each player until all pieces have been played and the player with the highest score wins.

It’s hard to overstate the simple joy of watching the pieces drop into the board and cause others to slide and shift (sometimes even vault!) to new locations in ways you might not expect. There will be a lot of laughs as the board builds in new and crazy ways.

And on one level Drop It really is that simple.

BUT…

Deciding which piece to select and where to drop it is heart of the game.

There are some basic restrictions that will determine whether or not the piece you drop will score points.

Your piece cannot come to rest on a piece with the same shape. So no squares touching other squares.

Your piece cannot come to rest on a piece with your color. So, if you’re blue, no blue pieces touching other blue pieces.

Also, as you stack pieces higher and higher, no piece can extend above the edge of the board.

Any time a piece you drop breaks one of these rules, tough luck! That piece will not score points.

If you manage to avoid these restrictions, then your piece will score points based on the highest drop zone it lands in. The lowest zone is 1 point, the next is 2 points and so on until you get to 8 points at the top. This means if most of a piece is in the 5 point zone but a small corner of your piece is poking over into the six point zone, you score 6 points.

There’s also a bonus dot in each drop zone. If any part of your piece overlaps with a dot you score bonus points. The dots come in three sizes: large medium and small. Large dots are 1 point, medium 2 points and small dots are worth 3.

The shape and color restrictions make Drop It a vertical logic puzzle. There’s a meaningful decision to make not just a feat of dexterity to perform.

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The side and bottom landing zone boards really make Drop It shine.

In addition to the basic restrictions, which apply anywhere, the bottom edge and sides of the board now have restrictions based on the landing zone boards you agreed to use at the beginning of the game.

The landing zones make edges off limits based on specific shape and color.

One bottom landing zone board, for instance, is divided equally between the four shapes in the game. If I drop a circle piece and it lands so it touches the circle landing zone… wah wah! No points for me.

Same goes for the sides. If your piece slides over to touch the landing zone side with a forbidden color or shape, no points for you.

This means on any given turn you have to consider what shape and color piece can land on any other already in play AND what shape and color piece can land against the edge of the board.

Each turn provides players with a chance to make a meaningful strategic decision. And this is the wonderful surprise waiting for you in the game.

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The simple joys of playing with gravity paired with puzzle logic makes Drop It a rewarding surprise full of many different flavors of Major Fun.

There are rules and variants to dial down the challenge for younger players and for more experienced droppers, the landing zone boards could be mixed and matched to create even more challenging restrictions.

The game gives on many levels – from the tactile joy of manipulating the pieces and watching them tumble and click into place – to the satisfaction and mischeivous glee of selecting the perfect piece to avoid any restrictions AND make life a little bit more challenging for your opponents.

Perhaps we should turn to Sir Isaac Newton since we’re talking about a game with gravity.

He said:

“Truth is ever to be found in simplicity, and not in the multiplicity and confusion of things.”

Drop It needs no embellishment. Its simple truth comes from a set of basic wooden shapes and a small set of restrictions. And within that simplicity we find layers and levels of fun that are rewarding in unexpected ways. What more could you ask of any game that’s Major Fun?

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Ya Blew It!

Release: 9/19/2018    Download:  Enhanced  | MP3
Run Time: 75 min    Subscribe:  Enhanced  | MP3 | RSS

There are lots of gems buried in this here mine. It’ll take some dynamite and a bit of luck to get the shiny ones you want without collecting cursed ones that’ll cost you dearly.

In Ya Blew It, you roll your stick of dynamite (a nifty 8-sided die!) trying to scoop up the best claims of gems before the prospector decides to nab them all. Mining is a high risk and reward business, so you have to play your cards just right to know when to press your luck and when to play it safe. The more you can build and protect your glittering collection, the more you’ll cash in for big points.

Tune in to explore the game and learn why we think Ya Blew offers up a heap of simple, addictive Major Fun.

Listen in for a full review and discussion.

Ya Blew It!

BGG  |  Wonder Forge  |  Buy

Designer: uncredited

Publisher: Wonder Forge

3-6 players  15-20 min   ages 8+   MSRP $17

For info on the The Meal and Sorting Table segments featured on the show, check out the show notes at The Spiel!

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Music credits include:

Anansi & The Box of Stories

Release: 6/26/2018    Download:  Enhanced  | MP3
Run Time: 150 min    Subscribe:  Enhanced  | MP3 | RSS

The Coleson-Conway era of The Spiel comes to a close with a celebration of our shared passion and love of trick-taking card games.

Anansi is a role-selection trick taker where players gain the abilities of animals from West African myths. Score points based on the tricks you take and avoid becoming the Fool.

Take the A Chord is a jazz themed trick taker where the Key (and the game) can change with a single card. Watch out for improvisations and try to take just the right number of tricks to win.

Listen in for a full review and discussion.

Anansi & The Box of Stories

Level 99 Games  |  BGG  |  Buy

Designer: Ken Maher   

Artist: Stephanie Johnson

Publisher: Level 99 Games

3-8 players  15 – 30 min   ages 8+   MSRP $25

 

For info on Take the A Chord and the other segments featured on the show, check out the show notes at The Spiel!

Music credits include:

Anansi Song Story   by Agya Koo Nimo  |  the song

Take the A Train  by Nikki Yanofksy  |  the song

Changes  by Moby Grape  |  the song

Boom, Bang, Gold!

Boom, Bang, Gold!   HABA  |  BGG  |  Buy

Designer: Alexandre Emerit
Artist: Timo Grubing
Publisher: HABA
2-4 players 20 minutes ages 7+
MSRP $30

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Things have never been the same since they found gold in the old mine at the edge of this frontier town. Prospectors, hunters, even the undertaker and the cook at the hotel are trying to get in on the action by tossing sticks of dynamite down the mine shaft and sifting through the rubble. Be careful, though, there are critters – bats, rats, snakes, and ghosts – lurking around and looking to cause trouble. When the dust settles, can you avoid the sheriff and collect the most gold in a day?

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Boom, Bang, Gold! has some outstanding and unique components. The box bottom is the gold mine. Inside the bottom of the box is a cardstock floor insert to make it springy.

There are 160 round tokens. Some have gold, some have fool’s gold, a few have critters, a few have tools, but MOST of the tokens are just rubble. Over half, in fact, (82) have rubble printed on both sides.

There are four characters in the game. Each character has a cool 3D treasure chest where you will bank your gold. Each character also has a flat shelf where you will place the gold and tools you collect during the game.

Hank the Hat, a Prospector,

Alma Anderson, hotel cook,

Tombstone Tony, the undertaker,

and Rattlesnake Ruby, a hunter.

There’s a pocket watch you’ll use to keep track of turns. And last but not least are four wooden sticks of dynamite, complete with string fuses! Each stick measures 3.5” long. They are hefty, bright, and just plain fun to hold and throw.

Setting up the game is really simple. Place all the tokens in the mine face down and shake them up a bit. Each player grabs a character with treasure chest, a shelf, and a stick of dynamite. Now you’re ready to play!

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Boom, Bang Gold! is a dexterity game for players with sharp eyes, quick hands, and ears that are always on alert.

There are 12 rounds in the game. Each round begins with the group (or one player) saying “Boom, Bang, Gold!”

Then, immediately and all at once, everyone tosses their dynamite into the mine. The goal is to throw your stick hard enough that it causes the spring loaded floor to bounce and flip over lots of tokens in the mine. You don’t need to be gentle but you don’t want to throw too hard either – no dents in the mine-box (or another player’s noggin!).

Once all the dynamite lands with a clatter and the tokens flip, it’s an all out race to collect gold from the mine. Only a face up gold token, fool’s gold, or tool can be collected onto your shelf, BUT…. There are a few basic rules every prospector must pledge to obey before grabbing their first nugget

You can only use one hand to grab.

You can only grab one token at a time.

You have to place the token you grab onto your shelf before grabbing another one.

First player to touch a token, gets it. 

You cannot turn over tokens in the mine.

 Do NOT collect critter tokens!

(We’ll come back to the critters in a second)

When all face up gold and tool tokens have been collected, we check to see if anyone has collected a tool token. If there are no tool tokens in play, then everyone gets to stash their gold (EVEN the fool’s gold!) in their treasure chest. Each gold nugget in your chest will be worth 1 point at the end of the game.

The mad scramble for tokens as the dynamite bounces into the box is hilarious and frenetic fun. On its own without any other tweaks, this throw and grab routine provides a lot of enjoyment for all ages. But Boom, Bang, Gold! doesn’t stop there…

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Tools and critters make Boom, Bang, Gold! more than just another knuckle-busting speed game.

There are four types of tool tokens: a pickaxe, a stick of dynamite, a sheriff’s badge and a revolver.

After everyone has caught their breath from a round of grabbing gold, if anyone has a tool, he or she will get a bonus based on which tool was found. If you’re really lucky, you might have found more than one tool, in which case you’d get more than one bonus.

The bonuses are handed out in a particular order which is printed on each character’s treasure chest.

First is the pickaxe. The bonus for the pickaxe is you get to flip over 5 rubble tokens in the mine. If you find any gold, you get to keep it!

Second, is the dynamite. You get to pick up a stick of dynamite and throw it into the mine again, but only you get to pick up gold tokens that flip face up.

Third is the Sheriff’s badge. Other players will groan if you get this one. The Sheriff can tell the difference between real gold and fool’s gold. All other players must put any fool’s gold tokens on their shelves back into the mine. The Sheriff is also a bit corrupt as well. The player who collected the badge get’s to keep the fool’s gold he or she collects.

NOTE: any fool’s gold already in your chest is safe. Only the fool’s gold you just collected this round is at risk of being caught by the Sheriff!

Fourth is the Revolver. You get to challenge another player to a duel. That player selects two gold tokens from his or her shelf and hides either one in each hand or two in one hand and none in the other. Then the owner of the revolver chooses a hand and gets to keep any gold he or she finds.

Each tool adds a fun wrinkle and added level of excitement to the game. And after one round, you’ll have the bonuses memorized, most likely.

The critter tokens, though, really make the game shine.

When flipped over by the dynamite, critter tokens are not collected. Instead, you need to warn your fellow miners about the dangerous critter your character is good at spotting. Alma Anderson is good at finding rats. You’ll see she has rats on her treasure chest.

If you are playing Alma and you see a rat in the mine, call out, “Watch out, a rat!”

All other players must immediately stop collecting tokens, place both hands on their head and shout, “Help!” Since you issued the warning, you may continue to collect tokens while the others are shouting for help.

This adds an extra level of silliness to the game that gets even better when you add the variations listed at the end of the rules.

Instead of a generic “Help!” when a warning is issued, there’s a specific gesture and phrase for each type of critter.

If I shout, “Watch out a bat!” You wave your hands around your head and say, “Go away!”

If I shout, “Watch out, a rat!” You put your hands behind your back and you say, “Squeak!”

If I shout, “Watch out, a snake!” You clap your hands together and you “Hissssss!”

If I shout, “Watch out, a ghost!” You cover your eyes and say, “OoooOOOoooo!”

Suddenly you have to be on the lookout for your own critter, you have to be ready to gesture and say the right thing if someone warns you, AND you have to be focused on collecting gold each round.

It’s hard to overstate the laughs and level of silliness this game can climb to when you play with the critters and all their gestures.

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Boom, Bang, Gold! is a game almost anyone can play and thorougly enjoy. You can start with just throwing dynamite and grabbing gold, add in the tools, then the critters with “Help!” and then critters with gestures and sounds. You can adjust it according to the age or experience of the crowd.

The game feels complete and full of the most laughs and silliness when you throw all these elements together. By the end, you’ll have players waving and clapping and squeaking and Ooooing… sometimes when they’re supposed to and many times when they’re not.

And winning? Yes, someone will end up with a lot of gold and other’s won’t. But no one will care.

That’s what makes Boom, Bang, Gold! both special and Major Fun.

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Decrypto

Release: 5/28/2018    Download:  Enhanced  | MP3
Run Time: 80 min    Subscribe:  Enhanced  | MP3 | RSS

Your team of spies intercepts a secret transmission… 3 words… a code tied to a sequence of numbers. There it is again! Another transmission, but this time with 3 new words.

Can you decipher these words into the proper sequence when the pressure is on? Remember, the other team is listening and trying to unravel your words and your seuqence at the same time!

Decrypto is a wonderful call-and-response party game where the challenge is to come up with clues that are just enough left of center to keep the other team from connecting the dots AND not so crazy that you fool your own team in the process.

The more clues you give, the harder this becomes and the more laughs you’ll have. And that’s a sequence that spells Major Fun!

Listen in for a full review and discussion.

Decrypto

Iello  |  BGG  |  Buy

Designer: Thomas Dagenais-Lespérance   

Artist: Fabien Fulchiron, NILS, Manuel Sanchez

Publisher: Iello

3-8 players  15-45 min   ages 12+   MSRP $20

For info on the Game Sommelier segment featured on the show, check out the show notes at The Spiel!

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Music credits include:

I Spy Theme  by  Earle Hagen  |  the song  | the album 

Theme from The Man from UNCLE  by Hugo Montenegrothe song

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Professor Evil & The Citadel of Time

Release: 5/10//2018    Download:  Enhanced  | MP3
Run Time: 104 min    Subscribe:  Enhanced  | MP3 | RSS

High atop a mountain in his castle, Professor Evil uses his time machine to rob the world of priceless antiques: the Mona Lisa, the Rosetta Stone, even Excalibur. He revels in his private gallery, the most secure one-person museum in the universe… his very own Citadel of Time.

Your small group of adventurers has been sent to sneak in to the Citadel and rescue at least four treasures before they are locked away. You must work your way past traps and locked doors and avoid Professor Evil himself as he wanders through the castle.

Whether you play Destiny Bradshaw, Mistress of Randomness, or Edward Wire, Lord of the Gears, the clock is ticking and time is not your friend. Get in and get the treasures before they are lost forever!

Professor Evil & The Citadel of Time feels like a game from a bygone era mixed with the care and thought of modern design. It’s charming, engaging, great for players young and old, and sure to provide many hours of Major Fun.

Professor Evil…
Fun Forge  |  Passport Game Studios  |  BGG  |  Buy

Designer: Matthew Dunstan, Brett J. Gilbert  

Publisher: Fun Forge, Passport Game Studio

2-4 players  30-45 min   ages 8+   MSRP $30

 

Melodice   melodice.org

Crowdsourced playlists for board games!

For info on the Truckloads of Goober segment featured on the show, check out the show notes at The Spiel!

Music credits include:

In Time  by  Sly & The Family Stone  |  the song

Time  by Tom Waits  |  the song

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Linkee

Linkee      Official Site  |  BGG  |  Buy

Publisher: Dean Tempest, Tristan Hyatt-Williams, Ben Drummond
P: Big Potato, Bananagrams
2-200 players  30 min. ages 12+  MSRP $22.50

text-the concept

Let’s start with a couple questions.

1. Corn, flat and pita are types of… ?

2. The full name of this African country is the Democratic _____ of Congo?

Bread… republic….

What’s the link? Not sure? Ok, let’s keep going.

3. Complete the lyric “Row, row, row your ____, gently down the stream.”

4. In bowling, if only the 7 and 10 pins are left, this is called a….

Bread, republic, boat and split. Do you see the link now?

It’s bananas, of course!

Welcome to Linkee, a party game that asks each team to find an off-kilter link between four questions/clues. Each round, teams will hear four questions and the first to find the link between the four answers will win a letter card. The first team to spell Linkee wins the game!

text-the components

As with so many party games, the main component in Linkee is a big box of question cards.

Each card has four questions leading to a link at the bottom. There are over 1400 questions in total!

The back of each card has a single letter, these letters spell out the work LINKEE.

There are also small notepads and pencils included for each team to take notes.

To play, split up all players into two or more teams. Pick a person to start as the Question Master and you’re ready to go!

text-the mechanics

You already know the basics, let’s dig deeper to learn the full game.

The Question Master will select a card and start by reading Question 1.

Teams will confer with each other to come up with an answer to this question. Even when your team thinks it knows the answer, don’t say it out loud! Write it on the notepad provided.

On to Question 2 and 3 and 4. Same thing. Pause after each question and kibbitz with your team until you settle on an answer. You’ll end up with four answers to four questions.

These answers are clues. Clues to the real question…. How are the answers connected? What’s the link?

At any point that your team thinks it knows the connection between the answers (even early on after 1 or 2 questions) you can stop the game by shouting LINKEE and declare the link out loud.

Let’s try one!

What is the name for a double bottle of Champagne?
Who did Tom Cruise profess his love to jumping on Oprah’s couch? Katie ____?
Beginning with a C, what is the capital of Sri Lanka?
What is the past tense of the verb to draw?

Scroll down a bit for the answers…

Here we go….

Magnum
Holmes
Colombo
Drew

Now that you have the clues, what’s the link? Scroll down for the answer….

Ready?

They’re all detectives!

If you’re incorrect, your team is out for this round and the other teams keep going until all four questions have been asked.

If you are correct, your team wins the card. Each card you collect puts you one step closer to winning. Remember each card has a letter on it’s back. The goal of the game is to collect cards that spell LINKEE. One letter down, five to go!

If teams get stuck even after the four questions, there’s a bonus hint the QM can read to give one last nudge toward the link. As before, the first team to say the link out loud wins the card.

At this point, it’s lather, rinse, and repeat until one team wins.

text-apart

What I love most about Linkee is how each turn your team builds toward an answer. Knowing one tidbit of information isn’t enough. You have to connect the dots by finding two or three clues at least. The more clues you have, the clearer the link will become.

The temptation is there all along to jump the gun and blurt out a connection before hearing all four questions, but the cards are tricksy and what might seem like the obvious link between two clues can take a sudden turn into left field with the final questions.

Each turn is paved with little victories and defeats along the way – it’s a journey. And this trip you take, building toward your team’s answer, makes each turn it’s own little story. It’s own little game inside the game.

There’s more satisfaction and fun each round because you build it – one clue at a time.

Your final answer to the big puzzle is only right because you’ve solved smaller puzzles along the way. This incremental payoff also means even the teams that don’t win the card in a round get to experience the fun from these little victories for each question.

text-final

Linkee takes a playful attitude toward the typical party game by wrapping a game within a game. This format also encourages people to come up with their own cards and questions (submit yours at playlinkee.com). In fact, over a third of the question cards in early editions of the game were crowdsourced in this manner! Start with a link and work backward to questions and clues OR come up with four crazy clues and find a devilish connection. I don’t ordinarily play trivia based party games and feel motivated to write my own cards. With Linkee, once you get your mind in synch with the format, it’s honestly hard not to go down that path.

You might think collecting the exact right set of letters would make this game drag on since you might get stuck in a cycle where your team can only win Ks or Ls for some odd reason. Not to worry, there’s a simple trading system that allows a team to swap three extra letters for one the team needs. There are also rules for teams forcing another team to discard a letter, but in my experience this rule just makes the game longer, not better. My advice is to ignore this rule unless you’re playing with a group that really likes messing with each other. Better to play a rematch than make the game outstay its welcome.

Linkee is simple, addictive, collaborative fun that builds and builds as you play. It’s a game that will bring lots of laughs to any party – a game where it’s easy to lose yourself in the fun of playing, no matter who wins or loses. And that’s the measuring stick of any great party game that calls itself Major Fun.

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