Sneaky Cards

sneaky cards

“Play it forward!” Oh, how long I’ve longed to find a good excuse to use that wonderful pun “Play it Forward.” Sheer brilliance.

Which is a foretaste of what you fall heir to once you open your box of Sneaky Cards.

The box. Ah, yes. Black and sneaky looking, but in a cute kind of way. With a magnetic lid. Oh, how love magnetic lids. But wait, there’s more, there’s in fact, not even having started.

There are 54 cards, color-coded. At the bottom of each card, there’s a rectangle onto which is printed a unique code for that unique card that you’d be holding in your hand at the time. Beneath that there’s a URL: SNEAKYCARDS.COM. Remember that.

On the cards themselves are instructions that not only you, but also whoever receives the card must follow. Yes, I said “receive.” For in this game, if there were such a thing as winning, you would have given ALL your cards away, playing it, as it were, forward in deed.

Let me further instantiate:

Purple Code.

Mission Objective: Grow

Find a new favorite song

Discover a catchy tune you’ve never hard before and write the artist and title below. Then pass this card along to someone else.

Pink Code.

Mission Objective: Create

Hiaku, once written

Fill the world with endless joy

Create one yourself.

Write a hiaku on a piece of paper, and then give it to someone along with this card.

Code Blue

Mission Objectives: Engage

Start the wave in a food court or cafeteria

When you do: Give this card to a stranger who joined you.

01 AwardYou may want or need to direct the person to go to the SNEAKYCARDS.COM website, click on “track this card” and enter the code on the card. Because that is the gateway to a great deal of fun, including the frequently-updated Sneaky Cards global tracking map.

Warning: just sorting through the cards to determine which ones you’d most likely be willing to use is a bit like riffling through your psyche, if you know what I mean. You learn a lot about yourself when you discover that you are simply not ready to “Lie down in a public place until someone checks on you.”

Yes, yes, this is a brilliant, innovative, fun and often surprisingly instructive little game, that we can’t, for the time being, recommend highly enough.

Sneaky Cards is based on an original concept by Harry Lee. From Gamewright, for one or more players, age 12 and up.

Rory’s Story Cubes – Batman

cubes
Rory’s Story Cubes has been a consistent winner here on Major Fun, and its newest incarnation, Rory’s Story Cubes – Batman, proves just as worthy of recognition as all its previous incarnations – not only because of its design, but also because, for the first time, the game goes beyond its own basic assumptions (all images on the dice must be abstract enough to allow for a wide variety of interpretations), to embrace a well-established story line. And what a story line! Batman! All those years, those characters, those crimes to solve, those bizarre semi-miraculous BatThings to put to use in defense of the good.

So here, for example, are all nine dice, in a row, ready for players to create their story. Hmmm. The first three icons are familiar enough: a timer, Penguin, and money. And then there’s a house. No, a mansion. Must be the Waynes’. So, we begin:

batcubes
 

“In the shadows of Gotham City, time, once again, seems to be running out. The notorious Penguin has been spotted preparing to hatch one of his nefarious plots to defame our hero and his family. He has just learned that a great deal of money is being held at Wayne Manor. His plan, not only to steal the money, but to replace it with counterfeit money laced with a powerful hallucinogen that makes Batman and his cohort talk like penguins…”

family-cooperative-creativeO, well, you get the picture.

The challenge is to use as many of the dice as you can in a story. You can make the story by yourself, with a partner, with everyone playing. If you don’t know what a particular icon stands for (like the next to the last icon – could be popcorn, you know, or, more probably, an explosion), you can make up your own relatively reasonable interpretation, look at the thoughtfully included guide that shows all 54 sides and their meanings, or, well, roll the die again.

The use of such a well-established theme provides a fantasy framework that helps new players get into the game, and players who are familiar with Rory’s cubes find a whole new way to think of the game, and all the other sets of cubes they may be fortunate enough to already own.

The set comes with 9 cubes, instructions, and a Batman-Belt-worthy carrying box, and is recommended for 1 or more creative players, ages 8 and up. Major, as you already probably concluded, fun.

Bellz!

Bellz
Bellz! is another one of those Major Fun games I use to show what Major Fun games are all about and for. You can tell as soon as you zip open the carrying case/game board (yes, I said zip, carrying case/game board) to find 40 brightly colored metal bells and a magnetic thing that has a powerful magnet on one side and a not-so-powerful magnet on the other.

dexterity-family-kidsThe bells come in three sizes: 20 of them are large, 12 medium, and 8 small. And, you guessed it, you try to pick up the bells with the magnetic thing. Bells of the same color, of course. And the first to get 10 balls of the same color wins. Yes, sorry, if you accidentally pick up what they often call “a bell of a different color” you lose all the Bellz! you thought you were going to get for that turn. And those little balls have that propensity to surprise, don’t you know.

You don’t really have to read the rules. You can make up your own. Those bright, colorful, happily tinkling bells and two-strength magnet are an invitation to play – all in themselves.

When we play-tested it with our local grandson, he decided we would compete for just one color, you know, see who could get the most green. And it turned out to be as significant challenge as it would have been if we played by the rules, which we did, which proved just as challenging as you’d want it to be.

[youtube]https://youtu.be/FBBEKIo1kbk[/youtube]
Bellz! from Wiggles 3D recommended especially for up to four, steady-handed people with a high frustration tolerance.

Zitternix (Keep It Steady)

So, here’s what you get when you open your box Zitternix. Take a minute. No more than two. See if you can figure out the rules.

If you’re still having trouble, read the following later:

If I wanted to my designer friends to know more about the kinds of games I really, truly admire (and am always a wee bit angry at myself for not having come up with the game myself), as so oft I do, I’d use Zitternex to show how close you can get to creating a completely self-explanatory games.

Still wondering what the rules are? OK, if you’re not, skip the following section and go on to the next:

The Rules

  1. You take all the sticks and put them through the ring so that the whole bundle can stand freely, noting, as you must, that the different color sticks have different properties. There’s fat blue, average red and slim yellow. This observation might help you win the game, at some point, when points are being counted.
  2. You roll the die and remove a stick of the corresponding color. If you make the big wooden ring touch the table, your turn has ended, so you set everything up again and basically wait until the whole game starts again. Which isn’t that long.
  3. And, yes, Fat Blue is worth 3 points. And, yes, the other sticks are worth fewer, arithmetically descending with relative girth.
  4. And then there are the rules it would talk you maybe longer to figure out, like: if it looks like you don’t have a good choice, and you already own a stick of the color in question you can place it back into the game. Which you probably will find minorly upsetting, unless you make the bundle fall. In that event, you will be more upset. And you can quit the whole game if you manage to get the bundle down to three sticks. And did you know that the further off the table the ring is, the longer the bundle will keep from collapsing?

And now for those of you who figured out the game:

dexterity-family-kids-partyOK, so it’s not completely self-explanatory. In fact, one of the things that makes Zitternix (called Keep It Steady in English-speaking countries) such a good toy/game (which makes it already a happy coincidence – a game that is as much a toy as it is a game) that it is just as easy to find new rules, new things to make it do and keep it from doing, for finding ways to play the game so that everybody gets to play even though they “lost” – kind of like a group solitaire, or playing the game on a slanted surface just to see what happens…

What Major Major Fun!

 

Telestrations after dark

telestrations after dark

There’s the Major Fun Award-winning Telestrations, which you, of course, know and love, as you deservedly should. Keep that in mind, and read on.

Playing Telestrations often makes you giggle. You giggle at your own incompetencies in trying to make a drawing that the next player will interpret correctly. You giggle at the other people’s drawings – especially when there’s something, shall we say, “suggestive” about them. Or when you could, if you were so inclined, so interpret them. It’s an adolescent kind of thing – that chance to be naughty-minded – a chance that most adults enjoy even more.

Party GameThus, it’s no wonder that, for adults, playing Telestrations After Dark (yes, the box glows in the dark, as will certain recesses of your eighth-grade minds) turns out to be even more giggle-worthy than its predecessors.

Inside your Telestrations After Dark box you will find 100, two-sided cards listing over 1200 words, 8 erasable color coiled sketch books, 8 dry erase markers, 8 tiny but effective clean up cloths and 8 after dark, color coordinated drink coasters that match the color of your coil, hence helping you identify which sketching-and-guessing book (and coaster) is yours.

The instructions are mercifully brief. Even more mercifully, the majority of the instructions are also written on each page of the sketch-and-guess books. And, if you’ve played any version of Telestrations before, you won’t even need those instructions.

The more people who play, the longer the game. A round shouldn’t take more than 15 minutes. The instructions include two different ways to score (“friendly” and “competitive”). We had more than enough fun just showing each other the completed books.

What makes this game so adult are the words that are included on the word cards (where else?). A relatively innocuous sample:

1. bearded lady
2. petting zoo
3. FICTIONAL CHARACTER
4. organ donor
5. sweaty palms
6. foreplay

As you can see, depending on your inclination, any of those words can be interpreted in a, shall we say, titillating manner. Underlined words indicate that you can make up your own even more titillating interpretation, should you find yourself titill-inclined.

Telestrations After Dark is designed for 4-8 adults after-dark-glowing adults. A game takes fifteen minutes at least. Telestrations After Dark is designed, illustrated and manufactured by USAopoly.

Spyfall

spyfall

Though Spyfall contains 240 cards (and 30 baggies), it is not a card game, at all, at all. It is a game of subtle questioning and even more subtle answering. And, once you get familiar with it, it’s O so totally Major Fun.

One player is the Spy. The rest of the players aren’t. They’re the ones who are trying to figure out which one is the Spy. The Spy, on the other hand, is trying to figure out where the players are.

Well, of course, they’re right around the table with everybody else. But that’s not the point. They’re also in one of thirty different imaginary locations, determined by the random selection of one of thirty different baggie-packed collections of cards. Each baggie contains (well, will contain, after you sort them out as instructed) 8 cards (beautifully rendered) showing one particular location, and one Spy card. The location cards also include the identity that the player who gets that card is supposed to have – but that’s only to make the game more appealing to the sophisticated Spyfall player you are so destined to become.

Say the location is a submarine (no, don’t say it, think it). You could be the commander, the navigator, the sonar operator, the radio operator, etc.

When it’s your turn, you get to ask anybody a question. Naturally, if you’re not the spy, you could wind up asking that question to the spy herself. By, you know, chance. And you really have to be careful not to be so specific in your question (e.g. “what do you see out of the periscope?”) to make it too obvious, but, on the other hand, you do want to ask a question that the spy might answer incorrectly (“what do you do for exercise?”).

Party GameSo what I’m saying here is that this game requires what they call “subtlety.” And it takes a while to master the art of subtlety to such a degree that you don’t out-subtle yourself. So it’s not one of your, well, obvious games. It’s easy to understand what you’re trying to do. But not so easy to figure out how to do it. That’s why we decided to call it a gamer’s game.

But it’s well worth the effort, because the fun is wide and deep, and you’ll want to play it again and again with everybody who either already knows how to play, or has a very good and patient sense of humor. It’s cooperative. It’s intelligent. It encourages cleverness. It’s a great way to get to know people, and yourself, too.

Spyfall takes about 5-15 minutes to play each round and is designed for 3-8 sneaky, but astute players (or teams). Depending on how many players, and how many rounds you decide to play, the game will take anywhere from 15 minutes to well over an hour. It is designed by Alexander Ushan, with art by Uildrim and Sergey Dulin, and is published by Cryptozoic Entertainment.

Schatz-Rabatz (Treasure Trouble)

schatz-rabatz

Schatz-Rabatz is a game of luck and speed. There are two versions: one, for younger players, is all about luck, speed and a little about visual and spatial discrimination (if you want to look at it that way); the other is all about skill.

The main elements of the game are the treasure chests, the wooden pieces that you try to fit into the treasure chest, the cards that tell you what pieces are eliminated (younger version) or what pieces to look for, the score cards and a sand timer.

In the younger version, a card is selected and placed face down on the table. The pieces (treasures) are placed in the middle of the table, in easy reach of all the players. Each player gets a treasure chest. The sand timer is started, and players race to fill their treasure chests. Naturally, you can fit in fewer large pieces than small. When time is up, you must put the lid on your treasure chest, and, if you have to, remove any pieces until you can fit the lid on correctly. The card is turned over. Any pieces depicted on the card are eliminated. The rest are counted for your score. The player with the most pieces remaining wins that round. Like I said, it’s mostly luck, which, for the right children at the right age, is exactly what everything is about. Also, the more players there are, the more the game is about making sure the other players don’t get the piece you’re looking for.

family-kids1In the older version, the cards are placed face up, so you can see what pieces you don’t want to collect. So there’s really no luck involved – only speed and skill (go for the smallest pieces first, try to fit in as many as you can, be sure none of the pieces you have selected are shown on the playing card, be sure everything fits). All this adds a certain amount of what one might call cognitive dissonance, and what another might call more fun – especially the older other.

All in all, a novel, and entertaining game, primarily for children and the adults who love them. Designed by Karin Hetling with art by Johann Rüttnger, Schatz-Rabatz is recommended for children ages 5 and up (small parts). It is produced by Noris, and is available in the US from Amazon.

Crash Cup Karambaloge

crash cup box
Crash Cup Karambaloge – yes, that’s the name of the game all right – reminded me of (pardon my literacy) a book by H. G. Wells (yes, that H. G. Wells) called Floor Games (there’s a PDF version here). It’s a book about H. G. and son playing miniature war games, using everything in the house they could find that would support the fantasy.

Crash Cup KarambalageCrash Cup Karambaloge is not a model war game, but it is in the same spirit. It’s a car-racing game, played with cardboard pieces, wooden supports, pucks, and score keepers. It’s really a starter set – even though it comes complete with everything you need to play, plus a rule book containing four different versions.

You play it on the floor, or on a table – any space wide and flat enough to build your race track. Much of the delight of the game comes from its simplicity, and the elegance of the little device you use to propel your vehicle (puck) through the race course – or whatever it is that you choose to build together.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=drPnZjc_Nmk[/youtube]

Everything about it reflects the kind of fun we advocate – simple, but intriguing mechanics; inviting skill, imagination and creativity – all in all, a genuine invitation to family play.

Recommended for children 6 and older, Crash Cup Karambaloge can be played with 2-6 players. It was designed by Heinz Meister and is available in the US from HABAUSA

dexterity-family-kids

Ozobot Bit

ozobot bit
Surely you remember Ozobot, the Major Fun award-winning robot that you program with colored lines and can play with on paper or on your tablet (with free, downloadable Major Fun Awardgames even)?

Now. you lucky people, there’s Ozobot Bit – smaller, with all the same museum-ready packaging and computer-enhanced abilities to follow paths that you draw with colored markers on a piece of paper or electronically on your tablet, and more: the opportunity to get far more deeply into the art and joy of programming using Google’s OzoBlockly visual programming language.

Ozobot Bit comes with two shells (each a different color) (OK, they’re helmets), a selection of pre-programmed playing mats, a calibration card, instructions, and USB charger – all housed in an expensive-looking, museum-quality plastic box – all in all, making a sweet, fun and robust connection between playing with a toy and learning to program with Java.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vS7GvLwnY2I[/youtube]

From Evollve, Inc. Ozobot Bit is recommended for school-age children to play with by themselves or in pairs.

Jumbo Bananagrams

jumbo-bananagrams

It always amazes me how much a game can change when you change its scale. Today’s example: Jumbo Bananagrams.

Yes, it’s Bananagrams – your basic, Major Fun, Keeper-award-winning crossword-making word game. Bananagrams jumbofied, however, becomes a team sport.  Because the letters are so large, and the game can take up so much more space, it becomes that much more engaging for the fortunate many.

word-party-family-kidsSay, for example, that you’re playing Jumbo Bananagrams with the equivalent of 4 players. Given the sheer hugeness of it all, you decide to play with four teams instead – let’s say teams of 4 players each. So, now you have 16 people playing. You know how much of the table a normal regulation Bananagrams game can take up? Well, with Jumbo Bananagrams you can easily use a whole lawn, or living room, or basketball court. And each time a new letter is added, everybody on your team has to be involved in figuring out where to put it, how to rearrange the letters to maximize the manifest cleverness of it all. O, the excitement! O, the teamwork! And if you happen to have a business of some kind, with a staff in need of exploring their abilities to work together, or just to have fun together, well, now you have a near perfect team-building activity.

And, of course there are many, many other games that all these large (3×3-inch), floppy letters inspire. Can you, for example, toss them so they spell a word? Can you make a relay race? A mixer for a conference of perhaps 144 people (take a letter, any letter – OK, that’s your letter; now run around and find other letter/people with whom you can make an impressively large word, or a word that rhymes with Google maybe, or a palindrome potentially.

And, yes, teachers can use these for thinly disguised educational purposes, engaging an entire class in a literacy exercise or vocabulary exercise or just plain exercise. Jumbo Bananagrams being not just a game (an excellent game, in fact) but a tool for genuinely fun, real-time, all-embracing personal, family and professional growth.

[youtube]https://youtu.be/p1_eCwIj5Zg[/youtube]
Scroll To Top